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Review of Locating the Self: Re-Reading Autobiography as Theory and Practice ..

Autobiography – An autobiography is a self-written account of ..

Up from Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington, 1856-1915

Great Theosophical teachings of Annie Besant and C.W. Leadbeater
same time, if he was a white man, the conductordid not want to insult him by asking him if he wasa Negro. The official looked him over carefully,examining his hair, eyes, nose, and hands, butstill seemed puzzled. Finally, to solve the difficulty,he stooped over and peeped at the man'sfeet. When I saw the conductor examining thefeet of the man in question, I said to myself, "Thatwill settle it;" and so it did, for the trainmanpromptly decided that the passenger was a Negro,and let him remain where he was. I congratulatedmyself that my race was fortunate in not losing oneof its members.

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Kenzaburo Oë | Autobiography of a Reader
The change of the attitude of the Negro ministry,so far as regards myself, is so complete that atthe present time I have no warmer friends amongany class than I have among the clergymen. Theimprovement in the character and life of the Negroministers is one of the most gratifying evidences ofthe progress of the race. My experience with themas well as other events in my life, convince me thatthe thing to do, when one feels sure that he has saidor done the right thing, and is condemned, is tostand still and keep quiet. If he is right, time willshow it.

 

Posts about Kenzaburo Oë written by Jon Lindsay Miles

Dastur Dhalla: The Saga of a Soul -- An Autobiography
I sometimes feel that almost the most valuablelesson I got at the Hampton Institute was in the useand value of the bath. I learned there for the firsttime some of its value, not only in keeping thebody healthy, but in inspiring self-respect and promoting virtue. In all my travels in the South andelsewhere since leaving Hampton I have always insome way sought my daily bath. To get it sometimeswhen I have been the guest of my own peoplein a single-roomed cabin has not always been easyto do, except by slipping away to some stream inthe woods. I have always tried to teach my peoplethat some provision for bathing should be a part ofevery house.

Autobiography of Shams-ul-ulama Dastur Dr
One of the trustees of the Tuskegee Institute, aswell as my personal friend, Mr. William H. Baldwin,Jr. was at the time General Manager of theSouthern Railroad, and happened to be in Atlantaon that day. He was so nervous about the kindof reception that I would have, and the effect thatmy speech would produce, that he could notpersuade himself to go into the building, but walkedback and forth in the grounds outside until theopening exercises were over.


The Real Reason Sugar Has No Place in Cornbread | …

In this address I said that the whole future ofthe Negro rested largely upon the question as towhether or not he should make himself, throughhis skill, intelligence, and character, of suchundeniable value to the community in which he livedthat the community could not dispense with hispresence. I said that any individual who learnedto do something better than anybody else - learnedto do a common thing in an uncommon manner - had solved his problem, regardless of the colourof his skin, and that in proportion as the Negrolearned to produce what other people wanted andmust have, in the same proportion would he berespected.

So I'm just going to say it: sugar has no business in cornbread

then living. I had heard much about him. WhenI first went into his presence, trembling because ofmy youth and inexperience, he took me by thehand so cordially, and spoke such encouragingwords, and gave me such helpful advice regardingthe proper course to pursue, that I came to knowhim then, as I have known him ever since, as ahigh example of one who is constantly and unselfishlyat work for the betterment of humanity.

Lebda, 1st Infantry Division – autobiography

On the morning of September 17, together withMrs. Washington and my three children, I startedfor Atlanta. I felt a good deal as I suppose a manfeels when he is on his way to the gallows. Inpassing through the town of Tuskegee I met awhite farmer who lived some distance out in thecountry. In a jesting manner this man said:"Washington, you have spoken before the Northernwhite people, the Negroes in the South, andto us country white people in the South; but inAtlanta, to-morrow, you will have before you theNorthern whites, the Southern whites, and theNegroes all together. I am afraid that you have gotyourself into a tight place." This farmer diagnosedthe situation correctly, but his frank words did notadd anything to my comfort.

It rained every day and the ground became a ..

In order to be successful in any kind ofundertaking, I think the main thing is for one togrow to the point where he completely forgets himself; thatis, to lose himself in a great cause. In proportionas one loses himself in this way, in the same degreedoes he get the highest happiness out of his work.